Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘roses’

The Louvre

Like many of you, Mike and I have been home bound since March. Back then, events we would normally attend, such as flower shows, were cancelled and non-essential businesses were closed along with our favorite restaurants. Since our two favorite things are traveling and roses (and going out to eat), we felt at loose ends. But we cancelled our trip to Santa Fe as well as all our lectures and concentrated on staying well and following the guidelines as they changed day to day. Things would get better and, as everyone said, “we’ll get through this.”

June Bloom in Chute’s Garden

We stayed busy working in our rose gardens, enjoying what was probably one of our best June blooms. We became familiar with webinars and using Zoom to attend meetings as well as provide our PowerPoint programs to rose societies and garden clubs. But after a few months, we started having what I call “travel withdrawal.” So I hauled out some photos of our memorable trips and watched some Rick Steves travel programs — which just made my withdrawal symptoms worse.

Mike & Angie at the Grand Canyon

While a picture is worth a thousand words, there’s no picture (or video) that can take the place of seeing something in person, whether it be a city, a historical site, or a rose garden. All the pictures of the Grand Canyon, for example, pale in comparison to standing on the South Rim and experiencing its vastness.

Renaissance Garden at David Austin Roses

All the photographs we saw of the gardens at David Austin Roses, while lovely, didn’t prepare us for the beauty and tranquility we saw and felt by being there in person. And Paris? One can only understand and feel the magic of Paris by strolling along the boulevards and backstreets, dining in small neighborhood cafes and exploring its museums, cathedrals, churches and parks.

As our travel withdrawal continued, we began thinking about our 2021 trip to France, a trip we were really looking forward to. Our itinerary was roughed in: we’d fly into Charles de Gaulle, rent a car then meander along the Seine through small towns on our way to Normandy. There we would spend a week rambling along the coast to Mount St Michelle, past Omaha Beach to Bayeux, Caen, Honfleur and maybe more. Then we’d head back to Paris for another 10 days to revisit our favorite places and take the train to various places like Lyon to see its famous rose garden. Voila. 

Four months ago we thought May 2021 was far enough away that surely Covid-19 would be behind us. Now, we don’t think so. Still, I wasn’t ready to scratch our plans just yet. So out of curiosity and boredom, I went on-line to see what international travel restrictions were in place.  

Sadly, what I found out is that, currently, non-essential travelers from the United States are not allowed in France. I also discovered that our favorite hotel in Paris, where we planned to stay, is closed indefinitely due to the pandemic. In addition, even if we were allowed to go to France, the thought of a long flight, despite the fact that planes are supposedly cleaner than they have ever been, was unappealing in itself. Taking all this into account, we realize that our 2021 trip just won’t happen.

So what about a road trip to a destination closer to home? At the present time, while travel restrictions between states here in New England change week by week, our travel options are limited and I don’t see that improving in the near future.

Armchair Travel Program

One way we have eased our travel withdrawal symptoms is by focusing on travel and roses, so we created an Armchair Travel program called “Rose Gardens of Europe,” a virtual way to visit the rose gardens at David Austin Roses as well as two Italian rose gardens — one in Rome and one in Florence. It will be ready to share with garden clubs and rose societies no matter where they’re located since we’re becoming more adept at Zoom presentations. It’s also a great way to remember and share our experiences at these memorable gardens.

River Seine – Paris

It seems there is no magic cure for our symptoms of travel withdrawal. If you have any suggestions, please pass them along. Meanwhile we’ll keep watching Rick Steves, pour over our photos with an eye to organizing them into additional Armchair Travel programs and with a few glasses of wine and good imaginations, we’ll be virtually walking along the River Seine and feeling the magic of Paris.

Read Full Post »

1a-Walsh-Ramblers

Walsh Ramblers

In early July, Angelina and I visited Woods Hole, a picturesque seaside village located in the town of  Falmouth on the southwestern tip of Cape Cod. The main street is a typical Cape Cod scene with shops and eateries along the waterfront that leads down to the ferry landing. Here travelers can board the popular ferry to Martha’s Vineyard or Nantucket.

However, had we made this trip 100 years ago, the landscape would have been very much different. On the hillside by the road entering town, we would have seen potting sheds, greenhouses and rows upon rows of roses. These roses were hybridized and grown for sale by Michael Walsh and the roses he bred became known as Walsh Ramblers.

4-Excelsa

Excelsa

Walsh had arrived in Woods Hole in 1875 and worked for a time as a gardener. In the 1890s, he began hybridizing ramblers, a climbing rose form having long, thin, supple canes with large clusters of small flowers. These were characteristics inherited from Rosa wichurana , a species rose that Walsh used extensively in his hybridizing program and is in the near background of most of his ramblers. These climbers are once-bloomers with an extended bloom cycle lasting from late June through mid July.

100 year old Walsh Rambler

100 year old Rambler

The reason for our visit was at the invitation of  Gretchen Warren, a Woods Hole resident and Walsh Rambler expert. We met up with Gretchen at the Woods Hole Historical Museum, the starting point of her fascinating walking tour of Walsh Ramblers. This tour weaved through quiet neighborhoods only a few blocks away from busy Woods Hole Road. She began by explaining the history behind these roses and how they came to be. As we walked along these tranquil side streets, Gretchen pointed out ramblers growing casually by the side of the road, along fences, and up and over stone walls. Many of them date back decades when they were planted by nursery workers who had lived in the area. Others were planted in lush private gardens of friends of Gretchen who graciously welcomed us in to visit. These were intimate English style-gardens half hidden from the road featuring roses and lots of other plants. This remarkable longevity, also inherited from wichurana, was highlighted as we passed a robust rambler, believed to be a Walsh Rambler, in a front yard that has been reliably dated back more than 100 years.

3-Debutante

Debutante

Ramblers grow rapidly and possess above average –– way above average –– disease resistance. Gretchen pointed out a few cases of powdery mildew, but for the most part the foliage we saw was amazingly clean.

5-Lady-Blanche

Lady Blanche

From the late 1890s through 1920, Walsh introduced 35 varieties  ––  a prolific achievement considering that his professional rose hybridizing career only spanned 25 years. Rose names are important for marketing purposes and Walsh had a fine touch. Charming names that we like include Excelsa, Arcadia, Evangeline, Hiawatha, Maid Marion, Lady Blanche, Coquina and Nokomis. (Gretchen gave us a rooted cutting that she believed to be Nokomis ––  fragrant pink and lavender blooms –– which I’ve planted along our fence with plenty of room to grow.)

6-Nokomis-Closeup

Nokomis

Now knowing what to look for, we spotted anonymous feral ramblers in full bloom scrambling along stone walls and fences on the way out of town surviving nicely on rain water and nutrients gleaned from the soil.

7-Nokomis

Nokomis

It doesn’t get much better for a couple of rosarians than a day trip to scenic Woods Hole to explore Walsh Ramblers and enjoy the hospitality of Gretchen Warren.

Read Full Post »

4-Therese-Bugnet

Therese Bugnet

Mike and I know our roses fairly well and can predict with some accuracy which will bloom first. Every year I keep track of  these first blooms in my rose journal and expect to see some buds open by the end of May. Below are some of our “first bloomers.”

It was no surprise that Therese Bugnet was the first to bloom in our garden in late May. This extremely winter hardy (to zone 3) hybrid rugosa has been in commerce since 1950. Its popularity continues because this is basically a “fool proof” rose that yields old-fashioned, very fragrant, medium pink flowers on a disease-resistant bush that grows 6’ to 8’ tall and repeats later in the season. She’s planted on the edge of the property and receives no water or fertilizer and definitely needs no winter protection.

1-Clair-Matin

Clair Matin

Historically, Clair Matin, a climbing rose, is another early bloomer in our garden. Introduced in 1960, we planted it over 20 years ago where it grows 10-12’ tall and 8’ wide. The medium pink blooms have a slight hint of fragrance and the June bloom on this large rose is impressive.

3-Scarlet-Sensation

Scarlet Sensation (aka Everblooming Pillar No. 73)

Another climbing rose that’s been a fixture is Scarlet Sensation (aka Everblooming Pillar No. 73), introduced by Dr. Walter Brownell in 1954. The first of our Brownell collection to bloom this year, it has large dark pink, fragrant flowers that bloom in clusters on a bush that grows 8 feet tall. Hardy to zone 5, it also is very disease resistant to black spot. Unfortunately, it is no longer widely available commercially.

2-Prairie-Princess

Prairie Princess

A newer addition to our garden is Prairie Princess, one of Griffith Buck’s winter hardy and disease resistant shrub roses. Mike planted it a few years ago and this year it produced its first blooms of the season on June 1. As you can see from the photo above, it has glowing golden stamens in the center of vibrant pink petals. We have it planted in the midst of chives in our sustainable rose garden.

6-Vanessa-Bell

Vanessa Bell

Last year we planted Vanessa Bell, a 2019 new introduction from David Austin Roses and the first of our Austin Roses to bloom. Vanessa Bell has beautiful, pale yellow many petaled, cup-shaped roses as well as a sweet tea fragrance.

It’s always rewarding to see these “first blooms” early in the season and know that in just a few weeks all the varieties we grow will join them in producing a spectacular June Bloom.

Read Full Post »

1 David_Austins_US_handbook_2019_cover_tn

Photo by David Austin Roses

If you’ve received David Austin’s Handbook of Roses for 2020, you have already seen the introductions available this spring for US and Canadian gardeners. If you haven’t received the handbook, you can read about Austin’s 3 new varieties:  ‘Tottering-by-Gently’, ‘Emily Brontë’,  and ‘The Mill on the Floss’ below.

 

Tottering-by-Gently

4 tottering_index_crop__tn

Photo by David Austin Roses

When we visited David Austin Roses this past summer, ‘Tottering-by-Gently’, a cheery yellow single rose, caught our eye, but we knew it would not be available in the US until 2020. While Austin roses are better known for dense, many-petaled roses, this is their first yellow single rose. And it is stunning. It has masses of flowers growing in large sprays. Its five petals surround golden stamens that attract beneficial insects as well as pollinators. This shrub has a musk fragrance and grows about 4 feet by 4 feet. Another benefit is it can produce orange-red hips if not deadheaded. ‘Tottering-by-Gently’ was named in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the cartoon of the same name, created by Annie Tempest, that was first published in “Country Life” magazine.

 

Emily Brontë

2 Emily-Bronte_index_crop__tn

Photo by David Austin Roses

What a charming rose Emily Brontë is with soft pink blooms of 100 petals. The soft pink is accentuated with pale apricot inner petals that surround a button eye. It is described by Michael Marriott, technical director and senior rosarian of David Austin Roses, as having flowers that “open with a fine tea fragrance” that changes in mid-bloom when “the tea fragrance wanes and old rose fragrance comes on strong.”  The growth habit is about 4 feet tall by 3.5 feet wide. It is named for Emily Brontë, well-known author of Wuthering Heights.

 

The Mill on the Floss

3 The Mill on the Floss

Photo by David Austin Roses

Unique coloration is distinctive of ‘The Mill on the Floss’. The deeply cupped blooms present as medium pink, but as they open further the pink becomes lighter and the petals develop a carmine-red outline. The rose blooms in clusters of 100 petals or so and have a nodding habit, characteristic of many Austin varieties. This rose, named for the novel by English writer George Elliot, has a sweet and fruity fragrance. Growth habit is 4.5 feet tall by 4 feet wide, but in warmer climates, it may grow larger.

 

These new introductions can be ordered as bare root roses from davidaustinroses.com. They will not be available at garden centers in the US until Spring 2021.

Read Full Post »

3-Chute's-Garden

Mike & Angelina’s Rose Garden in June

It’s January, the coldest time of the year. The rose gardens are dormant, the landscape is still and winter’s long post-holiday chill is just beginning. While this is the quiet time, Angelina and I are actively making plans for the upcoming year and preparing our 2020 Lecture Series.

Our entertaining PowerPoint lectures, workshops and seminars are designed to educate and make rose gardening appealing to even the most reluctant gardener. We annually review, revise, and refresh our program list as well as add new ones. New this year is “Rose Gardening Simplified” where we explain in simple, easy-to-understand language how to grow attractive, sustainable roses at home. (See the complete list of 2020 programs, dates, and times on the 2020 Lecture Series page.) For a description of our programs, visit our web site’s Program Page at RoseSolutions.

HomeGarden_Vert_2_23We open the season on Saturday and Sunday, February 22 and 23 at the 2020 Southeastern Connecticut Home & Garden Show at the Earth Tower Expo & Convention Center at Mohegan Sun in Uncasville, Connecticut. We will present our popular “Roses for New England” program at 1pm on Saturday and 11am on Sunday. This home and flower show continues to expand its garden-related programming and we are delighted to be involved. We are looking forward to this mid-winter double header at this fabulous casino venue.

 

6 Boston Flower Show logoOn Friday, March 13, we return to the Boston Flower & Garden Showat the Seaport World Trade Center and debut our new “Rose Gardening Simplified” program. Gardeners throughout the region flock here every March looking for an early taste of spring. This flower show is very special to us and we always enjoy our annual visit and the large, enthusiastic Beantown audiences.

 

Maine FS logoAnd on Saturday, March 28, we pack-up for an overnighter to Portland, Maine to speak at the Maine Flower Show, our third year at the this show located at Thompson’s Point along the Portland waterfront. This year’s presentation is an updated “Six Simple Steps to Successful Rose Gardening” program with time for plenty of Q and A. The audience here is an eclectic mix from all over northern New England as well as Quebec and the Canadian Maritimes.

1-Maine-Flower-Show

Garden at the 2019 Maine Flower Show

(We will have our two books, Roses for New England: A Guide to Sustainable Rose Gardening as well as Rose Gardening Season by Season: A Journal for Passionate Gardeners, available at all our lectures and workshops.)

On Saturday, May 2 at 10 am, we will be at Wildwood Nursery in East Greenwich, RI giving a lecture on basic rose gardening. This is part of the Rhode Island Rose Society’s annual “Rosefest”, a four-hour workshop on rose horticulture for home gardeners. Here’s an opportunity to learn rose care, including the best way to plant and prune roses from local rosarians. This event is free and open to the public.

 

3-Six-Simple-Steps-Title-SlOn Saturday, May 9 at 10am, join Angelina and me at Lincoln-Sudbury Adult Education in Sudbury, MA where we will present an expanded two-hour seminar of our “Six Simple Steps to Successful Rose Gardening” program. We cover all the rose gardening basics including the right way to plant and prune roses plus lots of Q and A– everything necessary to grow beautiful roses at home this spring. (Visit their web site: www.lsrhs.net/community/adult_ed or call 978-443-9961, x3326 for more information or to register).

In between all these events, our lecture series includes programs to garden clubs and presentations to various horticultural organizations. All this, plus time out for a trip to Santa Fe and the American Southwest, makes early 2020 another busy season for us.

Mike and Angelina Chute

Mike & Angelina

We  have been on the lecture circuit presenting lectures, conducting seminars and leading workshops for more than two decades and it never gets old. We are always  available to speak at flower shows, symposiums, conventions, and garden club meetings and will travel to just about anywhere. We can customize programs and even produce one-of-a-kind presentations. We continue to add bookings throughout the year so keep checking in. As always, if your organization needs a program at the last minute, contact mike@rosesolutions– maybe we can help.

So, even as the snow flies and the thermometer plummets, there is no one more optimistic than a gardener in January.

Happy New Year.

Mike and Angelina

Read Full Post »

6-Rhapsody-in-Blue

Rhapsody in Blue

We received our first 2020 rose catalogue in the mail and inside was a stunning dark lavender-purple rose. This new introduction, ‘Perfume Factory’, is a hybrid tea and the photo shows it at its most perfect form with petals swirling around a spiral center. What caught my eye was the tantalizing, deep purple color and I knew almost immediately that this new beauty was the creation of Tom Carruth. (To see a photo of ‘Perfume Factory’ go to edmundsroses.com).

 

1-Blueberry-Hill

Blueberry Hill

Carruth, former Director of Research for Week’s Roses, has hybridized a series of mauve roses. Tom’s hybridizing quest for a “true black velvet purple” rose began with his introduction of  ‘Blueberry Hill’ in 1998. We originally bought the rose because its name took us back to the 1950’s and Fats Domino’s rock and roll version of Blueberry Hill as well as to the 1970’s with Richie Cunningham (Happy Days) belting out “I found my thrill on Blueberry Hill.” But the rose ‘Blueberry Hill’ earned its place in our garden with its unique light bluish-lavender ruffled petals that formed large 4” blooms surrounding yellow stamens.

 

2-Outta-the-Blue

Outta the Blue

Next came ‘Outta the Blue’, one of our favorites, when it joined our growing number of Carruth’s mauve roses in 2000. It has the look of an old garden rose with blooms of deep magenta flecked with gold. And the intoxicating clove fragrance of its numerous sprays, together with its disease resistance, makes this a most desirable garden rose. It is also is a good exhibition rose and has won Best Modern Shrub in our rose show.

 

8-Outta-the-Bluecr

Outta the Blue Spray

In an interview Mike had with Tom Carruth, Tom related that he easily recalls the exact spot on the bench in the research greenhouse where his eye caught sight of the first bloom of what would become ‘Outta the Blue’. He describes the rose as having “a glowing luminescence that no photograph has ever completely captured.”  I agree. I have photographed ‘Outta the Blue’ over and over and while some photos show its luminescence, none show the intensity of its color that can only be caught by the naked eye.

 

5-Rt.-66

Route 66

Mike and I go through different color phases when selecting roses and we became captivated with Carruth’s mauve roses – hence we went through our purple roses period. Carruth introduced numerous mauve roses, including the deep purple ‘Route 66’ (Tom has a knack for naming roses and when we visited New Mexico we made it a point to travel along part of Route 66) and the floribunda ‘Ebb Tide’ (I remember the version of that song by the Righteous Brothers in the 1960’s) that has full, ruffled mauve blooms and a spicy, clove-like scent.

4-Ebb-Tide

Ebb Tide

We didn’t limit our pursuit of purple roses to Carruth roses. One of our favorite purples is ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ (Cowlishaw, 1999), named after George Gershwin’s  iconic composition. While being influenced by the name and the music, it was the combination of the rose’s deep purple petals, streaked with white stripes, surrounding incredibly dramatic golden stamens, that attracted our attention. ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ is very photogenic and while I have taken many photographs of this mauve beauty, my favorite is the one below that I framed and now display on our wall of rose photos.

7-Rhapsody-in-Blue

Rhapsody in Blue

We may have outgrown our “purple rose phase,” but a rose as beautiful as ‘Perfume Factory’ is hard to resist and we may just reconsider.

 

Read Full Post »

1 The-McCartney-Rose

The McCartney Rose – Hybrid Tea, strong spice fragrance

David Austin, founder of David Austin Roses in Albrighton, England, was once quoted as saying that a rose without fragrance is only half a rose. What a perfect way to describe a characteristic so essential to the identity of America’s national floral emblem.

While the delicious, delightful, slightly mysterious and often fickle quality of floral fragrance is now considered a highly desirable trait most prized by rose lovers, it wasn’t always so. This quality was willingly sacrificed by rose breeders in the nineteenth into twentieth centuries. Why? Rose hybridizing is a game of compromise with one trait willingly forfeited to gain another. Fragrance was often the victim of hybridizing choices that placed higher value on superior floral form, unique and vibrant colors, increased winter hardiness and stronger disease resistance.

Flash forward 100 years and the rose buying public now long for highly scented roses and commercial rose growers know it. While fragrance is an inherited trait, the gene for fragrance is recessive and crossing two fragrant varieties doesn’t necessarily produce fragrant offspring. Due to this unpredictability of rose genetics, contemporary rose hybridizers continuously search for the right genetic combinations that will add fragrance to other desirable characteristics. Since it takes eight to ten years from pollination to retail introduction, restoring a characteristic as elusive as fragrance has taken decades.

4-American-Beauty

American Beauty

Fragrance is produced by oils in the petals of the bloom with different oils creating distinctive fragrances. The American Rose Society lists twenty-four fragrances, the most well-known is the classic ‘rose’ scent. This intoxicating old rose or damask scent can be found in many red and pink roses like the old garden rose American Beauty, David Austin’s Mary Rose, Mr. Lincoln, and Chrysler Imperial.

5-Ebb-Tide

Ebb Tide

Other essential oils are responsible for the spicy, clove-like scent in the floribunda Ebb Tide. Sniffing Graham Thomas yields the light and delicate tea fragrance while Julia Child imparts a strong anise or licorice scent.

3-Graham-Thomas

Graham Thomas

2-Julia-Child

Julia Child

But fragrance can be subjective because everyone’s nose is different. Two people may smell the same rose and each will offer different descriptions. Fragrance also is influenced by temperature, humidity and the rose’s stage of bloom. A fully open bloom will have more scent than a flower that is partially open; the intensity ebbs as the bloom goes by. A blossom may have a strong scent on a warm, sunny day; take the same bloom on a cool, cloudy, breezy day and the scent will be subdued.

Time of day also impacts a rose’s fragrance. The highest concentration of oils are found in early morning which is why roses grown for their attar of roses (oils extracted from rose petals) are harvested then. (Our experience has been that every fresh rose bloom exudes some detectable scent, however subtle, under ideal conditions.)

Clearly, rose fragrance is highly desirable and has become its own reward. The presence of discernable fragrance, or the lack of it, often determines whether a variety gets introduced or not. Each hybridizer of the genus rosa has their personal hybridizing objectives. Each is looking for that unique, exceptional variety. Each is prepared to spend a professional lifetime searching for that one perfect and fragrant rose, the magnum opus of a career.

Read Full Post »

1-Chutes'-Garden

Mike and Angelina Chute’s Garden

After the holiday hubbub is over and tranquility returns, the new year presents itself and the gardening season begins again, as it always does, with great expectations. While the roses in our gardens are quietly resting under their winter cover, Angelina and I have been unusually busy planning for the 2019 season. We have accepted a number of invitations to present lectures and workshops, including a new home and garden show in Connecticut plus programs in area garden centers. Our entertaining PowerPoint lectures, workshops and seminars are designed to educate and make rose gardening appealing to even the most reluctant gardener. We annually review, revise, and refresh our program list as well as add new ones.

2-Cloud-10

Cloud Ten (Radler, white climbing rose)

New this year is “Radler Roses, Beyond Knock Out Roses.” This PowerPoint presentation highlights a number of attractive, disease resistant varieties that have been hybridized by Will Radler, breeder of the famous Knock Out family of sustainable roses. We describe these roses as being “beyond Knock Outs.” as they do not have “Knock Out” as part of their name. Will Radler has served as a consultant to this program and it will debut at the Boston Flower & Garden Show on March 19. (See the complete list of 2019 programs, dates, and times on the 2019 Lecture Series page.) For a description of our programs, visit our web site’s Program page at RoseSolutions.net.

3-Six-Simple-Steps-Title-Sl

Our season opens at the Southeastern Connecticut Home & Garden Show on Sunday, February 24 at the Mohegan Sun Casino. Our event starts at 12:15 with a Meet & Greet book signing followed at 1:00 pm by our “Six Simple Steps to Successful Rose Gardening” our most popular program. This is Rose Gardening 101 where we explain how to grow great roses in home gardens in six simple steps. There will be plenty of time for Q and A during and after the program.

6 Boston Flower Show logoOn Saturday, March 16, we return to the Boston Flower & Garden Show at the Seaport World Trade Center to present our new program for 2019, “Beyond Knock Out Roses; Discovering Other Sustainable Roses from Knock Out Hybridizer Will Radler.” We enjoy the high energy of the Boston show and especially the interaction with the big lively Boston audiences. (We will have our two books, Roses for New England: A Guide to Sustainable Rose Gardening as well as Rose Gardening Season by Season: A Journal for Passionate Gardeners, available at all our lectures and workshops.

We are looking forward to our visit to Russell’s Garden Center in Wayland, MA on Sunday, March 24 at 2:00 pm when we present the Six Simple Steps program. This event will include refreshments and door prizes. To register or for more information, go to www.russellsgardencenter.com or call 508-358-2283 x394.

5-Maine-Flower-Show-2018

Display at 2018 Maine Flower Show

We pack up and head north to Portland, Maine on Saturday, March 30, to speak at the Maine Flower Show. We presented a program there last year on cold-climate rose gardening that attracted an audience from across northern New England as well as Quebec and the Canadian eastern provinces. This year we’ve created another customized cold-climate program titled “Fifteen Remarkable Roses for Northern New England Gardens,” which focuses on successful rose gardening in USDA zones 3 through 5.

Home Garden Flower Show (4)We present the “Radler Roses, Beyond Knock Out Roses” program at the Rhode Island Home Flower & Garden Show on Saturday, April 6 at 1pm.  We had presented programs at the old RI Flower & Garden Show from 1998 until it closed a few years ago. Now it’s back again at the Rhode Island Convention Center in Providence and we’re glad. Go to www.ribahomeshow.com for more details.

Join us at the RI Rose Society’s “Rose Fest” on Saturday, May 4 at Chaves Garden Center, in Middletown, RI. We again present our Six Simple Steps program but in a garden setting using real plants as props instead of a digital PowerPoint program — a fun and unique way to demonstrate rose gardening.

4-Mike-Lecture-2018-RIRS-Ro

Mike Chute at 2018 RI Rose Society Rose Show

Saturday, June 15 at 1 PM is the Rhode Island Rose Society’s 21st annual rose show at the Wickford Community Center in Wickford, RI. Join Angelina and me at New England’s premier display of  roses of every type and color. At 1:30, we will use real roses grown in local gardens by home gardeners as props to demonstrate how simple it is successfully grow roses at home. Free and open to the public.

In between all these events, our lecture series includes programs to garden clubs and presentations to various horticultural organizations. All this, plus time out for a trip to Great Britain, makes early 2019 another active season for Angelina and me.

We are available to speak at flower shows, garden centers, garden club meetings, symposiums and conventions and will travel to just about anywhere. We can customize programs and even produce one-of-a-kind presentations. We continue to add bookings throughout the year so keep checking in. As always, if your organization needs a program at the last minute maybe we can help. Contact me at mike.at.rosesolutions.

Read Full Post »

 

3-Mr_David_C_H_Austin_and_B

David C.H. Austin                    (Photo: DavidAustinRoses.com)

David C. H. Austin, the founder of David Austin Roses Ltd,  passed away in December at the age of 92 in Albrighton, England, the town where he was born. He leaves a lasting legacy of extraordinary horticultural accomplishment having melded the virtues of old garden roses with those of modern roses, a daunting challenge. He had a clear vision of what could be and, through a lifetime of patience and persistence, followed his dreams and, in doing so, forever changed the international rose landscape.

The son of an English farmer, Austin’s interest was in horticulture more so than agriculture, particularly roses. As a young nurseryman in the 1950s, he loved the character and fragrance of traditional old garden roses and bemoaned their decline in popularity. While roses then were still a favorite plant of gardeners everywhere, the modern hybrid teas and floribundas with their repeat blooming ability and much broader color spectrum had pushed the once-blooming, old-fashioned roses with limited colors to one side.

Is it possible, Austin wondered, to capture the flower form and fragrance of the old roses — a rose with no fragrance, he was known to say, is only half a rose — and combine it with the remondancy (repeat bloom) and rich color palette of modern roses?

Thus, starting in his farmhouse kitchen 60 years ago, Austin began a life-long quest for his ideal rose, a quest that grew into an internationally recognized brand that is widely marketed throughout Europe and the United States.

1-Graham-Thomas

Graham Thomas

His first introduction was Constance Spry in 1961.  This beautiful, pink, fragrant climber is still available today but it was a once-bloomer and the pursuit of remondancy continued. The breakthrough came in 1983 when Austin introduced three varieties, Graham Thomas, Mary Rose, and Heritage, at the Chelsea Flower Show in London. Each had the desired old rose flower form, distinct fragrance, attractive colors as well as the all-important ability to re-bloom more than once per season. He referred to these three beauties as “English” roses and they shot him onto center stage in the rose world and he never looked back. His roses would go on to win 24 gold medals at Chelsea and he was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2007 for services to horticulture.

 

2-Heritage

Heritage

Over time, David Austin Roses developed the largest rose breeding program in the world, yielding 250,000 seedlings each year. Austin’s challenge was to balance the science of plant genetics with a vision of his ideal rose in a never ending search for certain key characteristics.  These distinctive traits include overall beauty, old fashioned floral form, outstanding garden performance, fragrance and “charm” — a British term meaning a unique difference from other roses. Achieving some of the desired characteristics in one variety is notable; achieving them all in one variety is the magnum opus of a career.

idOTkyMTFhNTIzZjBmNTc=-cdf7f5d58affa7387307346f149ae0e6

David Austin in Hybridizing Greenhouse   (Photo: DavidAustinRoses.com)

David Austin had said, “Every day, I marvel at my good fortune to have been able to make a life out of breeding roses. My greatest satisfaction is to see the pleasure my roses give to gardeners and rose lovers worldwide.” To that we reply, “It has been our good fortune to enjoy the beauty of these magnificent roses and to have benefitted from the vision of David C.H. Austin.”

 

If you would like to learn more about David Austin Roses, including details about his breeding program, we offer a PowerPoint Program, “David Austin’s English  Roses for New England Gardens.”

Read Full Post »

1-Chute.Rose-Show-RosesThis year I worried whether we would have roses to exhibit in the Rhode Island Rose Society Rose Show. Mike says I worry about this every year and he’s right. Somehow our roses always bloom in time for the Show. But this year we noticed that some of our roses bloomed earlier than usual. For instance, Yellow Brick Road was all bloomed out before the Rose Show. Other roses we normally exhibit at the show, like Playboy and Hot Cocoa, didn’t bloom until after the Show.

Still, we found plenty of roses to bring to the Rhode Island Rose Society Rose Show, “A Kaleidoscope of Roses,” on June 16. Some roses gave us so many sprays and blooms that we had enough of one variety to enter into several classes.

We grow a lot of sustainable shrub roses and have a collection of Renaissance roses, hybridized by Poulsen Roses from Denmark They include Sophia Renaissance (yellow shrub), Helena Renaissance (light pink) and Clair Renaissance. Clair, a beautiful, many-petalled, light pink shrub, was the only Renaissance rose ready for the show with two really fresh sprays. We entered one of them in the Modern Shrub Class. In addition to being good exhibition roses, Renaissance roses are also great garden roses that produce numerous sprays all season long.

4-Chute.-Best-Modern-Shrub

Clair Renaissance – Best Modern Shrub Class

One of our most prolific bloomers this year was Nouvelle France, also known as Party Hardy. Nouvelle France blooms in great clusters and is classified as a Hybrid Kordesii, which meant we could enter one spray in the Classic Shrub class. Since we grow it in our sustainable rose garden and it receives no pesticides, we entered another spray in the Au Naturel Class. Anyone looking for a disease resistant, winter hardy rose (this rose is hardy to Zone 3!), should consider this rose. We have 2 bushes of it planted, one on either side of our flag pole.

3.-Chute.-Best-Shrub.-Nouve

Nouvelle France – Best Classic Shrub Class & Best Shrub in Show

6-Chute.-Best-Floribunda-Pa

Passionate Kisses – Best Floribunda Class

The other very productive bloomer this year is Passionate Kisses. What a rose! It has irridescent, translucent medium-pink flowers that grow in clusters of 5-7 blooms. We must have had at least a dozen sprays blooming all over the rose bush the day before the show. We cut several of these sprays, one of which was chosen Best Floribunda Spray. We also entered a single in the Floribunda Class. We had so many flowers left over that we arranged them in the Floribunda English Box Class. This floribunda rose needs a bit more care than either Nouvelle France or the Renaissance roses, but can be a great addition to a home garden. It grows about 4 feet high and just as wide, so give it enough space if you decide to grow it.

 

 

5-Chute.-Passionate-Kisses-

Passionate Kisses – Best Floribunda English Box & Best English Box in Show

 

2.-Chute.-King.-Centennial

Centennial – King of Show

Some of the other roses that were ready for the show was Centennial, an easy to grow grandiflora rose by Ping Lim who gave us the Easy Elegance series. It bloomed just in time to win King of Show. Earth Song, one of my favorite roses, had many sprays, but they had all gone by except for one which we cut and entered in the Grandiflora Spray Class.

10.-Chute.Earth-Song.Best-G

Earth Song – Best Grandiflora Spray Class

 

8-Chute.-White-Cap.Best.A-S

White Cap – Best A Sea of Roses Class

 

We have some fun and interesting Challenge classes in our Show. One is called A Sea of Roses, a class where an exhibitor enters any white rose in a deep blue vase provided by the Show Committee. We entered White Cap, a Brownell climber, in this class.

 

 

 

 

This year we had so many blooms of White Cap that we also entered it in the English Box Class for “other” roses which include Climbing roses. As you can see from the photo, the White Cap blooms had the perfect form, size and substance and looked great against the black background of the English Box.

7-Chute-White-Cap-Best-Engl

White Cap – Best English Box Other

We came home from the show tired, but happy. When all was said and done, our garden didn’t disappoint, and we had plenty of roses to enter the show. Now the June Bloom is over and we’re deadheading the garden in anticipation of the August Bloom. All in all, it was a very good June Bloom.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Vanha Talo Suomi

a harrowing journey of home improvement & garden renovation

Melitastitches4fun's Blog

A place to share my needlepoint and connect with other stitchers.

The Rose Journal

Musings & Adventures of Two New England Rose Gardeners

Nuts about Needlepoint

Needlepoint & thread information from the Internet's Needlepoint Expert

Digging RI

The great outdoors in the smallest state

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.