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3-Winter-Moth

Winter Moth larva

Here in the Northeast, spring is taking its time arriving. Mike had to postpone pruning because of cold temperatures and a snow storm on April 4th that brought us 5″ of snow. Now with temperatures a bit more in the normal range, our roses are starting to show a burst of new growth, but with warmer temperatures comes a new annual event — the arrival of winter moth larvae.

Winter moths are small, light brown moths that were first recorded around 1930 in Nova Scotia. They slowly migrated south along the east coast into New England, were detected in Massachusetts in the 1990s and arrived in Rhode Island in 2004. Our first encounter with them was several years ago. The moths mate in early December, hence the name, and lay their eggs in trees and shrubs. The eggs hatch sometime in April in our garden. It’s this larvae stage that does the damage by feeding on a wide variety of plants including our roses and blueberries.

1 Winter Moth Damage

Foliage Damage

Mike noticed chewed-up foliage and discovered moth larvae yesterday — small, green caterpillars that had rolled up in a silky cocoon inside our rose leaves. This is when they surreptitiously eat away on the foliage and young rose buds unless an intervention takes place.

While we very rarely apply insecticides in our garden, we do spray our roses, as well as our blueberry bush, for winter moths with a very low toxicity product called Spinosad. This is a naturally occurring soil dwelling bacterium that works on larvae by contact as well as by ingestion — IF applied at the right time. The best time to apply Spinosad is immediately after egg-hatch in early spring before the tiny worms tunnel into buds.

2.Captain-JackSo today Mike applied his first dose of “Captain Jack’s Deadbug,” an organic pesticide containing Spinosad.  (Another effective product is “Monterey Garden Spray.) Usually, spraying twice, seven days apart will solve the winter moth problem and as an added benefit, rose sawflies will be controlled at the same time.

Without the use of Spinosad, the foliage on our trees, roses and blueberry bushes wind up looking like Swiss cheese. Since Captain Jack’s toxicity is extremely low, we find that using this product gives us the best outcome.

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Passionate-Kisses

Passionate Kisses: One of our 25 Favorite Roses

Tempus Fugit…it really does. 2015 has gone by in a blink and now the Christmas season is upon us with the New Year arriving in a few weeks. This means the spring flower shows and the start of our 2016 Lecture Series are right around the corner.
Our entertaining lectures, seminars and workshops are designed to illustrate to every gardener the enjoyment of growing roses. We have developed two new programs recently to add to our repertoire – “Rose Gardening Season by Season” which follows our second book, Rose Gardening Season by Season: A Journal for Passionate Gardeners, published last February. The second program is “12 Great Roses Anyone Can Grow” which identifies 12 attractive easy-care varieties.
RI Flower ShowWe open the season in February with two New England Flower Shows. On February 18, Angelina and I demonstrate basic rose care at the Rhode Island Spring Flower and Garden Show and return the following day, February 19, to present “Rose Gardening Season by Season.” (See the complete list of programs, dates and times on the 2016 Lecture Series page. See tab above.)
Ct Flower  Garden Show BannerOn Saturday, February 20 we hit the road to Hartford and the Connecticut Flower and Garden Show with two programs. At 11am we present our “David Austin’s English Roses for New England Gardens”, featuring several new Austin 2016 introductions. And at 2pm Angelina and I reprise our “Twenty-Five Fabulous Roses” program that we introduced last year. A busy weekend.
Boston Flower ShowWe travel north to Beantown on Saturday March 19, to début a special lecture at the Boston Flower and Garden Show called “Rose Gardening Season by Season – Let nature Show the Way.”

 

Olivia Rose

Olivia Rose Austin: 2016 David Austin Introduction       Photo by David Austin Roses

On April 2, in Newport RI at the American Rose Society’s Yankee District Convention, we again present “Twenty-Five Fabulous Roses”. And On April 7, we continue to promote sustainable rose gardening with “12 Great Roses Anyone Can Grow” for the Barrington (RI) Community School.
On June 18, Angelina and I discuss rose-garden basics at the Rhode Island Rose Society’s 18th annual rose show in Wickford, RI. This is a short talk followed by lots of Q and A from the public.
In between all these events our schedule includes visits to garden clubs and other horticultural organizations throughout New England plus time out for a trip to The Netherlands, Belgium and France, making early 2016 another busy season for Angelina and I.
So as one season melds into another, we again look forward to making new acquaintances as well as catching up with old friends, some that we only see once a year. With the New Year also comes the realization that we have been presenting lectures, conducting seminars and leading workshops on all aspects of rose culture for over two decades and yet it never gets old.
We are available to speak at symposiums and conventions and will travel to just about anywhere. We can customize programs and even produce one-of-a-kind presentations. We continue to add bookings throughout the year so keep checking in. As always, if your organization needs a program at the last minute maybe we can help. Contact me at mike@rosesolutions.net.
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year
Mike and Angelina

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2.-The-Northeast-Gardener-M

It’s mid November and we’re preparing our rose gardens for winter before we put away the gardening tools. Last year at this time we were wrapping-up our 2nd book, Rose Gardening Season by Season: A Journal for Passionate Gardeners, and getting it ready for publication in time for the spring flower shows. This year Mike and I have started another project: a complimentary quarterly E-Newsletter called “The Northeast Rose Gardener.”

Since 90% of the questions we receive revolve around the nuts & bolts of basic rose care, we decided to publish a seasonal electronic newsletter to address fundamental rose gardening. In each issue of “The Northeast Rose Gardener” we’ll delve into on the seasonal tasks that need to be performed as well as basic rose horticulture. We plan to include tips and anecdotes from our two decades of rose gardening in the northeast corner of the United States.

Our first issue explains winter protection for roses and includes a few Do’s and Don’ts. If you would like to receive our free newsletter, send your email address to angie1@rosesolutions.net (Subject line to read The Northeast Rose Gardener) and I’ll add you to our mailing list.

To kick off “The Northeast Rose Gardener’s” debut, Mike and I are providing a Special Holiday Gift Offer on our web site www.rosesolutions.net

1.Note-CardsReceive 2 FREE note cards of my rose photographs of Sexy Rexy and Julia Child with the purchase of any 2 of our books. This offer is good until Dec. 17, 2015.
Happy Thanksgiving

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Route 66

Route 66

Our roses started their long slow drift into dormancy in mid-August. But you would hardly know it with the beautiful end-of-summer bloom cycle our garden has produced this year.

Mike fertilizes each rose bush for the 3rd and final time no later than mid-August and that provides enough nutrients to produce a great September bloom. Plus it keeps them well-nourished and healthy going into the cold and windy winter season so they can emerge raring to go next spring.

I love the photo opportunities that our gardens present in September and October, so I’m often in the garden snapping photos of whatever roses are in bloom. While autumn roses will often be smaller than those produced in June, the colors may be more intense. Here are a few of our favorite photos taken lately.

It’s not easy to catch the color of mauve roses just right, but Mike caught Route 66 perfectly one morning recently. Route 66, hybridized by Tom Carruth in 2001, is a shrub rose with small, single blooms. Their petals are a dark velvet purple and what makes them unique is the almost black outer edges on the fresh bloom. (See photo above)

Campfire

Campfire

We planted Campfire, the floribunda we blogged about back in June, and once it was in the ground, it really took off. We captured its harlequin array of colors by going out in the garden every day to catch it in its various stages of bloom. The photo below is my favorite Campfire.

Campfire

Campfire

Blueberry Hill, another Carruth rose, is planted among larger roses in our garden, and I always seemed to miss a good photo-op until a few weeks ago. Its yellow stamens and lavender petals caught my eye.

Blueberry Hill

Blueberry Hill

We replaced our old Sexy Rexy rose this year with a new Sexy Rexy. It takes a season for a new rose bush to really settle in but I managed to snap this photo in September. Sexy Rexy is a very floriferous floribunda introduced by Sam McGredy in 1984. It has beautiful, frilly medium pink flowers that bloom in great clusters.

Sexy Rexy

Sexy Rexy

Early one morning when Mike was checking to see if we had had any unwanted visitors to the garden during the night (i.e., deer – thanks to our deer fence we have had no unwanted visitors…yet), he spied a dramatically illuminated Playboy bloom. He came back to the house, grabbed his camera and captured the image of the flower highlighted by a single ray of golden early morning sunshine streaming between canes of the large Graham Thomas rose nearby. He caught the photo in the nick of time as the moment went by quickly. It reminds us of some of Van Gogh’s paintings with the play of bright and dark colors.

Playboy

Playboy

It’s now the middle of October and there are still a few varieties in bloom thanks to the spectacular early autumn weather we’ve been having. But, one by one, as the days get shorter and nights get colder, the garden roses are shutting down for the season. While the weather forecast predicts the season’s first hard frost this weekend, there’s still a little more time to enjoy the last roses of summer.

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Peak Bloom

Peak Bloom in Our Garden

Each spring we wonder when peak bloom will occur in our garden. We consider the current spring’s weather and the harshness of the previous winter and then venture a guess. Ideally, peak bloom happens a few days prior to the Rhode Island Rose Society’s annual rose show which this year was held on June 20. While our garden actually peaked on June 15 (this is purely a subjective judgment on Mike’s part), many of our shrub roses had gone-by. Regardless, the garden was still full of other roses that we could take to the rose show.

RI Rose Society Rose Show Awards Table

RI Rose Society Rose Show Awards Table

Rose Shows serve several purposes; the first is to display the genus rosa in all its glory to the public – the show is free and open to all in the afternoon. There is a class in the show for every type of rose and the gardening public can see them all under one roof. The second is to satisfy the competitive nature of local rose gardeners who vie for ribbons and bragging rights.

Unlike last year when we cut roses in the rain the night before the show, this year the weather was perfect – sunny and dry. Mike and I went from rose bush to rose bush, cutting and labeling roses. One of our favorite ways to exhibit our roses is in English Boxes which means we need 6 fresh blooms each the same size and stage of bloom so they all match. So we keep an eye peeled, looking for these possibilities as well as other sprays and single blooms. After selecting the best stems, we place them in vases of cold water and store in a dark, air-conditioned room overnight so we’re ready to go first thing in the morning.

Queen of Show

Queen of Show

The morning of the show we arrived at 7 am and started prepping our roses. The first rose we prepared was Smokin’ Hot, a new hybrid tea introduced in 2014 by Weeks Roses. Since we don’t have many hybrid tea roses in our garden any more, this variety was an exception. We got Smokin’ Hot in early May and it was still in its container because we evaluate each new variety for one season before giving it a place in the garden. Well, Smokin’ Hot lived up to its name and gave us a fiery orange-red bloom with perfect hybrid tea form which won Queen of the show. Needless to say, Mike awarded it a coveted spot in our garden a few days later.

Cherry Parfait

Cherry Parfait English Box

Another rose we like is Cherry Parfait, a grandiflora rose that we planted in 2005. It’s aptly named because of its color – white petals with lipstick red edges that swirl around the bloom. In an English Box, each rose looks like a bowl of cherry ice cream with ripples of whipped cream. We brought 2 large sprays to the rose show and entered it in 2 different classes: English box and Grandiflora spray. Both won blue ribbons and Best of Class.

Cherry Parfait Spray

Cherry Parfait Spray

Day Breaker, a peachy-apricot floribunda that produces sprays of 5-7 blooms and glossy immaculate foliage had bloomed perfectly for the show. Like Cherry Parfait, we entered Day Breaker in 2 classes: Floribunda spray and English Box for Floribundas where it won Best of Class in both classes. The Day Breaker English Box also was voted Best English Box in show.

Day Breaker Spray

Day Breaker Spray

The June bloom is over and it was one of our best ever. Mike thinks it was due, in part, to all the snow we had last winter that was beneficial to the garden, a new meal plan he developed for the garden, plus a little help from Mother Nature.

Day Breaker: Best English Box

Day Breaker: Best English Box

One thing I’ve learned over time is it’s pointless to worry about whether we have roses for our rose show; that’s out of our hands. If we do, that’s great, if not, we still have them to enjoy all season. But we can’t complain this season, our roses arrived on schedule and we were able to enjoy exhibiting them as well displaying to the public the beauty of America’s National Flower.

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The McCartney Rose

The McCartney Rose

A few days ago we returned from our trip to Seattle and Vancouver where we visited some fantastic gardens (posts about them to come later). The climate in the Pacific Northwest is milder than ours here in southern New England and those gardens, while not at peak, displayed more color than we had when we left home in late May. At that time, nothing was in bloom in our gardens except a few irises and we were curious about what we’d find when we returned home. We weren’t disappointed. The gardens were in fantastic shape thanks to the cool, rainy weather and the care of our brother-in-law Ray who watered while we were away.

Garlic

Garlic

Garlic Scapes

Garlic Scapes

The garlic had grown by inches and put out its curly scapes and our sky blue delphinium had flowered. Most importantly, our roses were on the cusp of blooming with swollen buds that were cracking color and ready to burst – some of which we hoped would wait for our Rose Show in two weeks.

Clair Matin

Clair Matin

It was no surprise to find that big Clair Matin was in full bloom since it’s always the first to bloom. We also expected to see Super Hero in bloom, although I was surprised to see so many flowers.

Super Hero

Super Hero

We were pleased to see that The McCartney Rose (see lead photo), which Mike had pruned quite hard due to significant winter kill, had come back as good as ever with strong new canes and lots of buds.

While I won’t know which rose was the absolute first to bloom this year, I took photos of the garden so I’ll have a record of which roses bloomed while we were away.

As we approach mid-June, our gardens are blooming right on schedule despite last winter’s never-ending bitter cold, snowy, weather. Just as they always do.

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Campfire Roses

Campfire Roses

Mike and I are always on the look-out for hardy, disease-resistant roses we can recommend. While these sustainable roses are not hard to find, we like varieties that are more than landscape roses and offer interesting color.

Photo Credit: Cornhill Nursery

Campfire Rose Photo Credit: Cornhill Nursery

Enter Campfire, one of the Canadian Artists series from Agriculture Canada’s rose-breeding program. What sparked our interest in Campfire, aside from it being winter hardy to USDA Zone 3 and its disease resistance, is its color. Each bloom begins with yellow and red buds that open to yellow with deep pink edges. What’s unique about this rose is that the flowers that bloom early in the season will be yellow with pink edges, but later in the season, the pink edges becomes more pronounced. The bush has been described as harlequin-like with a display of yellow, red and pink flowers against a backdrop of glossy green foliage. Another plus for Campfire is its compact growth habit that doesn’t overwhelm the home garden. It also blooms all season up until the first hard frost.

Photo Credit: First Editions Plants

Campfire Rose  Photo Credit: First Editions Plants

Unfortunately, Campfire is not available locally. We searched on-line to see where we could find this rose and while it is advertised on Bailey Nurseries’ web site, it wasn’t available. Mike called a rose wholesaler in St. Catharines, Ontario who listed it in their catalog, to find out where in New England we could find Campfire. They knew of only one garden center in New England who carried it – Lake Street Nursery in Salem, New Hampshire. We called Lake Street twice. The first time Mike was told they hadn’t received their shipment from Canada yet. The second time he found out the order had arrived the day before and they had 10 Campfires in stock. We drove up to New Hampshire that afternoon and brought home two Campfires.

The research we did on Campfire yielded some interesting facts. One is that it is a hybrid of My Hero and Frontenac. My Hero, an Easy Elegance rose no longer available, was the predecessor of Super Hero, one of our favorite Easy Elegance roses that is extremely disease resistant.

Artist Tom Thomson & Campfire Rose Photo from canadianartistsroses.com

Artist Tom Thomson & Campfire Rose
Photo from canadianartistsroses.com

The other interesting back story to this rose is that it was named to honor renowned Canadian artist Tom Thomson’s painting called “Campfire” which shows a camp fire burning in front of a tent. (See photo below). Ironically, this masterpiece hangs in the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, a museum Mike and I visited a few years ago. Unfortunately, we were unfamiliar with Tom Thomson’s work at the time and didn’t get the chance to see this painting.

Campfire by Tom Thomson

Due to some horticultural sleuthing, good luck and timing, we now have the rose named after his painting and we’re looking forward to seeing the kaleidoscope of yellow, red and deep pink blooms all season long. We’ll let you know if Campfire lives up to its reputation.

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