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Archive for the ‘Campfire rose’ Category

5-Playboy

Playboy

It’s inevitable. Nothing prevents the arrival of cold weather finishing off another gardening season. As daylight diminishes and temperatures steadily decline, our bushes produce smaller and fewer blooms, but I’m appreciative of anything they have to offer.

 

Here are some photos of our hardy ever-blooming roses — the final blooms of the season.

Playboy is a showy floribunda giving us clusters of scarlet and gold throughout the summer. I was a bit surprised to find this spray a few days ago as Playboy usually shuts down by late October. (See photo above) The colors are a bit more saturated and deeper than blooms earlier in the season due to less sunlight and cooler temps. This was an unexpected bonus.

 

3-Julia-Child.Rina-Hugo-(1)

Rina Hugo

Rina Hugo: what a season she had! This hybrid tea, hybridized in 1993, is a deep saturated pink and has given us flowers with perfect hybrid tea form — each bloom on the end of a long, sturdy cane.

3.-Rina-Hugo-in-vase

Rina Hugo (August Bloom)

Earlier in August, while our  Rina Hugo was amid a great second bloom, I cut some and put them in a vase.  A few days ago, Rina was well into her third bloom cycle on robust 24” canes.

 

What can I say about Campfire? (Photo below) This shrub keeps on blooming with its ever-changing palette of color. It’s not an exhibition rose by any means, but it’s a 10 as a garden rose adding color and interest in the garden up to first frost. This is the third season with Campfire and it has more than lived up to its reputation as a prolific, colorful bloomer on a highly disease resistant bush with an obedient growth habit — an unusual  combination of desirable characteristics found in a single variety.

2.-Campfire-bush

Campfire

Another late bloomer is Lady Elsie May. Like Campfire, it is extremely disease resistant and with its orange-pink flowers against glossy — very glossy — dark green foliage, it’s a delight to have in the garden.

7-Lady-Elsie-May

Lady Elsie May

Then there’s Julia Child. From both my kitchen and studio window, I enjoy Julia’s blooms almost every day. She typically doesn’t have a lot of blooms this late in the season, but each one is perfection. I’m still enthralled by Julia’s form and color and her anise fragrance is an added bonus.

4 Julia-Child

Julia Child

When I was walking through the garden taking pictures, I had a pleasant surprise. Pretty Lady, a rose bush I can’t see from any windows in our home, had given us a perfectly lovely, soft pink rose, surrounded by buds ready to open — if this unusually warm weather continues.

6-Pretty-Lady

Pretty Lady

So even though old man Winter is lurking around the corner, our roses are maintaining their domain as Queens and Kings of our garden.

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Route 66

Route 66

Our roses started their long slow drift into dormancy in mid-August. But you would hardly know it with the beautiful end-of-summer bloom cycle our garden has produced this year.

Mike fertilizes each rose bush for the 3rd and final time no later than mid-August and that provides enough nutrients to produce a great September bloom. Plus it keeps them well-nourished and healthy going into the cold and windy winter season so they can emerge raring to go next spring.

I love the photo opportunities that our gardens present in September and October, so I’m often in the garden snapping photos of whatever roses are in bloom. While autumn roses will often be smaller than those produced in June, the colors may be more intense. Here are a few of our favorite photos taken lately.

It’s not easy to catch the color of mauve roses just right, but Mike caught Route 66 perfectly one morning recently. Route 66, hybridized by Tom Carruth in 2001, is a shrub rose with small, single blooms. Their petals are a dark velvet purple and what makes them unique is the almost black outer edges on the fresh bloom. (See photo above)

Campfire

Campfire

We planted Campfire, the floribunda we blogged about back in June, and once it was in the ground, it really took off. We captured its harlequin array of colors by going out in the garden every day to catch it in its various stages of bloom. The photo below is my favorite Campfire.

Campfire

Campfire

Blueberry Hill, another Carruth rose, is planted among larger roses in our garden, and I always seemed to miss a good photo-op until a few weeks ago. Its yellow stamens and lavender petals caught my eye.

Blueberry Hill

Blueberry Hill

We replaced our old Sexy Rexy rose this year with a new Sexy Rexy. It takes a season for a new rose bush to really settle in but I managed to snap this photo in September. Sexy Rexy is a very floriferous floribunda introduced by Sam McGredy in 1984. It has beautiful, frilly medium pink flowers that bloom in great clusters.

Sexy Rexy

Sexy Rexy

Early one morning when Mike was checking to see if we had had any unwanted visitors to the garden during the night (i.e., deer – thanks to our deer fence we have had no unwanted visitors…yet), he spied a dramatically illuminated Playboy bloom. He came back to the house, grabbed his camera and captured the image of the flower highlighted by a single ray of golden early morning sunshine streaming between canes of the large Graham Thomas rose nearby. He caught the photo in the nick of time as the moment went by quickly. It reminds us of some of Van Gogh’s paintings with the play of bright and dark colors.

Playboy

Playboy

It’s now the middle of October and there are still a few varieties in bloom thanks to the spectacular early autumn weather we’ve been having. But, one by one, as the days get shorter and nights get colder, the garden roses are shutting down for the season. While the weather forecast predicts the season’s first hard frost this weekend, there’s still a little more time to enjoy the last roses of summer.

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Campfire Roses

Campfire Roses

Mike and I are always on the look-out for hardy, disease-resistant roses we can recommend. While these sustainable roses are not hard to find, we like varieties that are more than landscape roses and offer interesting color.

Photo Credit: Cornhill Nursery

Campfire Rose Photo Credit: Cornhill Nursery

Enter Campfire, one of the Canadian Artists series from Agriculture Canada’s rose-breeding program. What sparked our interest in Campfire, aside from it being winter hardy to USDA Zone 3 and its disease resistance, is its color. Each bloom begins with yellow and red buds that open to yellow with deep pink edges. What’s unique about this rose is that the flowers that bloom early in the season will be yellow with pink edges, but later in the season, the pink edges becomes more pronounced. The bush has been described as harlequin-like with a display of yellow, red and pink flowers against a backdrop of glossy green foliage. Another plus for Campfire is its compact growth habit that doesn’t overwhelm the home garden. It also blooms all season up until the first hard frost.

Photo Credit: First Editions Plants

Campfire Rose  Photo Credit: First Editions Plants

Unfortunately, Campfire is not available locally. We searched on-line to see where we could find this rose and while it is advertised on Bailey Nurseries’ web site, it wasn’t available. Mike called a rose wholesaler in St. Catharines, Ontario who listed it in their catalog, to find out where in New England we could find Campfire. They knew of only one garden center in New England who carried it – Lake Street Nursery in Salem, New Hampshire. We called Lake Street twice. The first time Mike was told they hadn’t received their shipment from Canada yet. The second time he found out the order had arrived the day before and they had 10 Campfires in stock. We drove up to New Hampshire that afternoon and brought home two Campfires.

The research we did on Campfire yielded some interesting facts. One is that it is a hybrid of My Hero and Frontenac. My Hero, an Easy Elegance rose no longer available, was the predecessor of Super Hero, one of our favorite Easy Elegance roses that is extremely disease resistant.

Artist Tom Thomson & Campfire Rose Photo from canadianartistsroses.com

Artist Tom Thomson & Campfire Rose
Photo from canadianartistsroses.com

The other interesting back story to this rose is that it was named to honor renowned Canadian artist Tom Thomson’s painting called “Campfire” which shows a camp fire burning in front of a tent. (See photo below). Ironically, this masterpiece hangs in the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, a museum Mike and I visited a few years ago. Unfortunately, we were unfamiliar with Tom Thomson’s work at the time and didn’t get the chance to see this painting.

Campfire by Tom Thomson

Due to some horticultural sleuthing, good luck and timing, we now have the rose named after his painting and we’re looking forward to seeing the kaleidoscope of yellow, red and deep pink blooms all season long. We’ll let you know if Campfire lives up to its reputation.

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Polar Roses

Polar Roses

As a native New Englander, I enjoy the four distinct seasons we have and take pleasure in each one. But, I have become very, very weary of this winter. Weary of the snow canyon that my driveway has become and weary of the unusually bitter, subzero cold. And I’m weary of staring at the heavy snow still piled high in the gardens even though I realize that snow provides ideal insulation for roses from the frigid cold and wintery winds we had throughout February.

Snowbound Rose

Snowbound Rose

Meanwhile, I continue my winter morning routine, which includes the daily crossword puzzle in the newspaper, marking time until the snow melts enough for me to get started with spring clean-ups. (What is a five letter word for rock debris?) Then comes my favorite early spring activity – spring pruning!

Campfire

Campfire

So, as my gardening mojo rises and as I patiently wait for winter to break, I consider the ambitious plans that Angelina and I have made for the 2015 gardening season. We have settled on several new rose varieties to put in and evaluate: Campfire is a tough little red and yellow blend floribunda from the Morden Experimental Farm in Manitoba Canada. New to the US market, this latest introduction to the Canadian Artists Series is hardy to USDA zone 3. Another is an attractive apricot climber called Della Balfour that we saw last summer in the garden of our friends, Dacia and Clive. I’ll grow Della as bush as we have no room for another climber. The last variety on this season’s wish-list is David Austin’s The Lady Gardener, a fragrant, pure apricot shrub rose new in 2015. (See photo in previous post.)

Della Balfour

Della Balfour

Because of our success last year with sunflowers, garlic, and assorted vegetables, Angelina and I have selected more seeds to plant this spring with an eye towards the creation of a cottage garden. Along with three varieties of sunflowers, each a different height, we’ll add larkspur and aubretia. We had seen great clusters of purple/blue aubretia growing in Ireland last May both as cultivated plants as well as feral flowers sprouting from nooks, cracks, and crannies everywhere. Larkspur is an annual form of delphinium and our plan is to sprinkle seeds in the middle of the bed and see how that works out as companions to roses. Add a small veggie bed with two tomato plants, two eggplants and two rows of string beans planted along side a small bed of hard neck garlic planted last October. Eclectic gardening for sure.

Aubretia in Adare, Ireland

Aubretia in Adare, Ireland

More plans include a full garden restoration in 2015 – a major project – as well as a trip to Seattle and Vancouver this spring. We’re even are thinking ahead to 2016 and a journey by car throughout France into Belgium and The Netherlands.
It’s a good thing we have the perfect journal, Rose Gardening Season by Season: A Journal for Passionate Gardeners, to keep track of everything we have planned.
(A five letter word for rock debris? Why Scree, of course.)

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