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Archive for the ‘Blueberry Hill rose’ Category

6-Rhapsody-in-Blue

Rhapsody in Blue

We received our first 2020 rose catalogue in the mail and inside was a stunning dark lavender-purple rose. This new introduction, ‘Perfume Factory’, is a hybrid tea and the photo shows it at its most perfect form with petals swirling around a spiral center. What caught my eye was the tantalizing, deep purple color and I knew almost immediately that this new beauty was the creation of Tom Carruth. (To see a photo of ‘Perfume Factory’ go to edmundsroses.com).

 

1-Blueberry-Hill

Blueberry Hill

Carruth, former Director of Research for Week’s Roses, has hybridized a series of mauve roses. Tom’s hybridizing quest for a “true black velvet purple” rose began with his introduction of  ‘Blueberry Hill’ in 1998. We originally bought the rose because its name took us back to the 1950’s and Fats Domino’s rock and roll version of Blueberry Hill as well as to the 1970’s with Richie Cunningham (Happy Days) belting out “I found my thrill on Blueberry Hill.” But the rose ‘Blueberry Hill’ earned its place in our garden with its unique light bluish-lavender ruffled petals that formed large 4” blooms surrounding yellow stamens.

 

2-Outta-the-Blue

Outta the Blue

Next came ‘Outta the Blue’, one of our favorites, when it joined our growing number of Carruth’s mauve roses in 2000. It has the look of an old garden rose with blooms of deep magenta flecked with gold. And the intoxicating clove fragrance of its numerous sprays, together with its disease resistance, makes this a most desirable garden rose. It is also is a good exhibition rose and has won Best Modern Shrub in our rose show.

 

8-Outta-the-Bluecr

Outta the Blue Spray

In an interview Mike had with Tom Carruth, Tom related that he easily recalls the exact spot on the bench in the research greenhouse where his eye caught sight of the first bloom of what would become ‘Outta the Blue’. He describes the rose as having “a glowing luminescence that no photograph has ever completely captured.”  I agree. I have photographed ‘Outta the Blue’ over and over and while some photos show its luminescence, none show the intensity of its color that can only be caught by the naked eye.

 

5-Rt.-66

Route 66

Mike and I go through different color phases when selecting roses and we became captivated with Carruth’s mauve roses – hence we went through our purple roses period. Carruth introduced numerous mauve roses, including the deep purple ‘Route 66’ (Tom has a knack for naming roses and when we visited New Mexico we made it a point to travel along part of Route 66) and the floribunda ‘Ebb Tide’ (I remember the version of that song by the Righteous Brothers in the 1960’s) that has full, ruffled mauve blooms and a spicy, clove-like scent.

4-Ebb-Tide

Ebb Tide

We didn’t limit our pursuit of purple roses to Carruth roses. One of our favorite purples is ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ (Cowlishaw, 1999), named after George Gershwin’s  iconic composition. While being influenced by the name and the music, it was the combination of the rose’s deep purple petals, streaked with white stripes, surrounding incredibly dramatic golden stamens, that attracted our attention. ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ is very photogenic and while I have taken many photographs of this mauve beauty, my favorite is the one below that I framed and now display on our wall of rose photos.

7-Rhapsody-in-Blue

Rhapsody in Blue

We may have outgrown our “purple rose phase,” but a rose as beautiful as ‘Perfume Factory’ is hard to resist and we may just reconsider.

 

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Route 66

Route 66

Our roses started their long slow drift into dormancy in mid-August. But you would hardly know it with the beautiful end-of-summer bloom cycle our garden has produced this year.

Mike fertilizes each rose bush for the 3rd and final time no later than mid-August and that provides enough nutrients to produce a great September bloom. Plus it keeps them well-nourished and healthy going into the cold and windy winter season so they can emerge raring to go next spring.

I love the photo opportunities that our gardens present in September and October, so I’m often in the garden snapping photos of whatever roses are in bloom. While autumn roses will often be smaller than those produced in June, the colors may be more intense. Here are a few of our favorite photos taken lately.

It’s not easy to catch the color of mauve roses just right, but Mike caught Route 66 perfectly one morning recently. Route 66, hybridized by Tom Carruth in 2001, is a shrub rose with small, single blooms. Their petals are a dark velvet purple and what makes them unique is the almost black outer edges on the fresh bloom. (See photo above)

Campfire

Campfire

We planted Campfire, the floribunda we blogged about back in June, and once it was in the ground, it really took off. We captured its harlequin array of colors by going out in the garden every day to catch it in its various stages of bloom. The photo below is my favorite Campfire.

Campfire

Campfire

Blueberry Hill, another Carruth rose, is planted among larger roses in our garden, and I always seemed to miss a good photo-op until a few weeks ago. Its yellow stamens and lavender petals caught my eye.

Blueberry Hill

Blueberry Hill

We replaced our old Sexy Rexy rose this year with a new Sexy Rexy. It takes a season for a new rose bush to really settle in but I managed to snap this photo in September. Sexy Rexy is a very floriferous floribunda introduced by Sam McGredy in 1984. It has beautiful, frilly medium pink flowers that bloom in great clusters.

Sexy Rexy

Sexy Rexy

Early one morning when Mike was checking to see if we had had any unwanted visitors to the garden during the night (i.e., deer – thanks to our deer fence we have had no unwanted visitors…yet), he spied a dramatically illuminated Playboy bloom. He came back to the house, grabbed his camera and captured the image of the flower highlighted by a single ray of golden early morning sunshine streaming between canes of the large Graham Thomas rose nearby. He caught the photo in the nick of time as the moment went by quickly. It reminds us of some of Van Gogh’s paintings with the play of bright and dark colors.

Playboy

Playboy

It’s now the middle of October and there are still a few varieties in bloom thanks to the spectacular early autumn weather we’ve been having. But, one by one, as the days get shorter and nights get colder, the garden roses are shutting down for the season. While the weather forecast predicts the season’s first hard frost this weekend, there’s still a little more time to enjoy the last roses of summer.

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